Events

March 1, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Katie Genadek Faculty Associate - University of Colorado Boulder, Institute of Behavioral Science
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March 8, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Yu Xie Professor of Sociology and the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies - Princeton University
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March 15, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Rob Warren Professor of Sociology and Director, Minnesota Population Center - University of Minnesota
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March 22, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Judith Levine Associate Professor - Temple University, College of Liberal Arts
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March 29, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Michael Lachanski Graduate Student - University of Pennsylvania, Population Studies Center
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April 5, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Ben Wilson Postdoctoral Researcher - Stockholm University
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April 12, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Arnstein Aassve Professor - Bocconi University, Department of Social and Political Sciences
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April 13, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Location: Zoom Webinar
Social-Spatial Climate Collaborative (SC2)
Description:

To guarantee healthy, carbon-free homes across the United States, we need to build green social housing at scale. And there’s no better model than Vienna, the global capital of social housing—and a city frequently ranked as the best in the world to live in. Vienna has been building social housing for a hundred years. This housing is known for both its architectural innovation and quality, and for the financial sustainability of the model. Any discussion of building green social housing at scale in the United States must learn from the Vienna model.

Today, nearly a third of Vienna’s city’s population lives in city-run housing, while another third lives in housing that is also subsidized and insulated from market pressures. But to learn all the lessons from Vienna’s social housing model, we must dig beneath the surface to uncover what’s most promising—and what isn’t working. How does Vienna currently fund new social housing, and the maintenance of housing that already exists? How is it incorporating climate and sustainability issues into its projects? And how well is it doing in terms of housing immigrants and refugees, who suffer racism and processes of stigmatization in Austria? 

To answer these questions, we have one of the world’ foremost experts on Vienna’s housing model. Wolfgang Förster directs PUSH Consulting, a Vienna-based private consulting company in the areas of urban planning and housing which advises both policy makers and public, not-for-profit and private developers. Förster is also Former Deputy Director of Vienna Housing Fund, and Former Head of Vienna State Housing Research Department. He has organized a global exhibit on Vienna’s social housing model, is the co-editor of The Vienna Model 2: Housing for the City of the 21st Century (Jovis 2018), and is the editor of 2000 Years of Housing in Vienna: From the Celtic Oppidum to the Residential Area of the Future (Jovis 2020).

Those of us in the United States must also discuss which elements of Vienna’s model are most applicable, which errors are most relevant, and which ideas demand the greatest ongoing discussion. To develop that debate, we will hear responses to Förster’s presentation from Nikil Saval, the State Senator for Pennsylvania’s First District, who was elected in 2020 as a Homes Guarantee candidate committed to a dramatic expansion of green, affordable housing options in Philadelphia; and from Ilona Duverge, Co-Founder and NYC Director of Movement School, and the leading grassroots organizer for a Green New Deal for Public Housing. 

Daniel Aldana Cohen, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Director of the Socio-Spatial Climate Collaborative, or (SC)2, and a leading researcher around housing and climate justice will moderate.

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April 19, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Various Students Present Graduate Students - University of Pennsylvania, Population Studies Center
Location: Zoom Meeting
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April 26, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Christopher Winship Professor of Sociology - Harvard University
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May 3, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Location: Zoom Webinar
Social-Spatial Climate Collaborative (SC2), Perry World House
Description:

The politics of the climate emergency are inextricably entwined with public and private investment at a planetary scale. There can never be adequate climate policy in one country alone; and there can certainly never be climate justice in one country alone. So how can one link domestic and global climate politics in 2021? More precisely, policymakers, social movement, researchers, and others in the United States currently face a Big Question

How should US-based Green New Dealers—and other advocates of ambitious climate justice action—understand, respond to, and engage with climate politics in other parts of the world? 

This panel, “Global Climate Justice Against Neo-Colonialism: New Concepts and Priorities for Just Cooperation,” considers our Big Question in the broad context of climate politics across the regions of the planetary economy. The panel is also part of a broader series, called Democratizing Global Green Investment: Aligning Domestic and International Policies around Green New Deal Principles, which will also feature discussions focused on Latin American and Chinese climate politics.

The overall context is changing rapidly. This year, we’ve entered a new age of climate geopolitics. The United States is once again committed to massive green investment and some measure of low-carbon ambition. President Biden has outlined four ambitious targets for the United States: carbon neutrality by 2050, a 50% cut in emissions by 2030, a carbon-neutral electric grid by 2035, and 40% of climate investments benefiting disadvantaged communities. As a result of all these measures, the world’s three great economic blocs—the United States, China, and the European Union—which together comprise nearly two thirds of the global economy, are now all committed to carbon neutrality—by 2050 for the US and EU, 2060 for China. And all are committed to prioritizing massive amounts of green investment.

So the age of global climate politics has arrived. But will these economic blocs invest enough to reach their targets? Will they invest in ways that promote equity? And how will great power competition shape these dynamics? In the US and around the world, advocates of a Green New Deal, or climate justice more broadly, cannot afford to focus only on domestic climate politics—or only on interstate climate politics, as if the dynamics within countries were wholly separate from global politics. It is all interconnected.

In this panel, researchers engaged in both US and global climate politics will take up these questions, in the context of all the political changes of this year, and of the aftermath of the April 22-23 climate summit hosted by the United States. Join us.

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May 11, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Location: Zoom Webinar
Social-Spatial Climate Collaborative (SC2), Perry World House
Description:

The politics of the climate emergency are inextricably entwined with public and private investment at a planetary scale. There can never be adequate climate policy in one country alone; and there can certainly never be climate justice in one country alone. So how can one link domestic and global climate politics in 2021? Could it be possible to forge a “Pan-American Green New Deal” that centers workers and communities, while deconstructing centuries of American imperialism in the region? Certainly, any move toward continental climate justice will require policymakers, social movement, researchers, and others in the United States to face a Big Question

How should US-based Green New Dealers—and other advocates of ambitious climate justice action—understand, respond to, and engage with climate politics in other parts of the world? 

This panel, “A Pan-American Green New Deal? Green Investment, Extraction Battles, Reforestation,” considers our Big Question in the broad context of climate politics in the Americas. The panel is also part of a broader series, called Democratizing Global Green Investment: Aligning Domestic and International Policies around Green New Deal Principles, which will also feature discussions focused on global climate justice struggles across regions and Chinese climate politics.

The overall context is changing rapidly. This year, we’ve entered a new age of climate geopolitics. The United States is once again committed to massive green investment and some measure of low-carbon ambition. President Biden has outlined four ambitious targets for the United States: carbon neutrality by 2050, a 50% cut in emissions by 2030, a carbon-neutral electric grid by 2035, and 40% of climate investments benefiting disadvantaged communities. As a result of all these measures, the world’s three great economic blocs—the United States, China, and the European Union—which together comprise nearly two thirds of the global economy, are now all committed to carbon neutrality—by 2050 for the US and EU, 2060 for China. And all are committed to prioritizing massive amounts of green investment.

What about Latin America? One idea is the “Big Push” for sustainability framework that is being studied by the UN’s Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC, or CEPAL in Spanish and Portuguese); this investment-first approach to a green transition has been developed by panelist Camila Gramkow. We know that Brazil, green industrial policy has had some important successes, especially in the wind industry, as our panelist Kathryn Hochstetler has shown. But the question of green transition must also consider the question of extraction, a massively contested process—and discourse—across the continent, on which our panelist Thea Riofrancos has written. And of course, it is impossible for Latin America to slash its greenhouse gas emissions without reversing deforestation in a socially equitable way with Indigenous leadership, especially in the Amazon, which is the life’s work of Beto Veríssimo, co-founder of the great Amazonian organization Imazon.

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May 19, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Location: Zoom Webinar
Social-Spatial Climate Collaborative (SC2), Perry World House
Description:

The politics of the climate emergency are global. Policymakers, social movement, researchers, and others in the United States currently face a Big Question:

How should US-based Green New Dealers—and other advocates of ambitious climate policy—understand, respond to, and engage with climate politics in other parts of the world?

That question is particularly fraught when it comes to Chinese climate politics, especially in the current moment, where a number of political elites in both of the United States' leading political parties are casting China's economic rise as a fundamental threat to U.S. interests. We worry especially about the prospect of a new Cold War. How can progressive forces in the U.S. counter the bellicose Cold War rhetoric and mobilization, without reflexively defending all that China does? After all, there is a lot to oppose. How can U.S. based climate movements push a more cooperative relationship with Chinese climate politics? What is the best way for U.S. progressives to push China to decarbonize more rapidly—at home, and in its world-spanning infrastructure projects? What would progress look like?

Speakers:
• Tobita Chow, Director, Justice is Global, People’s Action
• Kevin Gallagher, Professor and Director of Global Development Policy Center, Boston University
• Joanna Lewis, Associate Professor and Director of Science, Technology and International Affairs Program, Georgetown
• Arpatim Sahay, Senior Policy Manager, Green New Deal Network

Moderator: Kate Aronoff, The New Republic, author of Overheated
Host: Daniel Aldana Cohen, Director of (SC)2, Penn (PSC)

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September 13, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
A computational view of the field of demography
M. Giovanna Merli Professor, Public Policy and Global Health - Duke University, Global Health Institute
PSC Fall 2021Colloquium Series | Location: McNeil 395
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September 20, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Family Norms in Flux
Julia A. Behrman Assistant Professor of Sociology - Northwestern University
PSC Fall 2021Colloquium Series | Location: McNeil 395
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September 27, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
An inside look: Self-care behaviors of African immigrants with chronic diseases
Onome H. Osokpo Postdoctoral Fellow, Biobehavioral Health Sciences - University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing
PSC Fall 2021Colloquium Series | Location: McNeil 395
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October 4, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Reflections on COVID-19 Trends Among Latinos: The Evolving Story
Rogelio Sáenz Professor of Demography - The University of Texas at San Antonio
PSC Fall 2021Colloquium Series | Location: McNeil 150
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October 11, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Marginal Returns: Race, Family Structure, and Children’s Life Chances
Christina J. Cross Postdoctoral Fellow, Sociology - Harvard University, Department of Sociology
PSC Fall 2021Colloquium Series | Location: McNeil 150
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October 18, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
The Shift Project: Using Non-Traditional Survey Methods to Monitor Low-Wage Work
Kristen Harknett Professor, Social Behavioral Sciences - University of California, San Francisco
PSC Fall 2021Colloquium Series | Location: McNeil 150
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October 25, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Improving Public Sector Service Delivery: The Importance of Management
Adrienne Lucas Professor of Economics - University of Delaware, Alfred Lerner College of Business and Economics
PSC Fall 2021Colloquium Series | Location: McNeil 150
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