Religious Attendance and Mortality: Implications for the Black-White Mortality Crossover

TitleReligious Attendance and Mortality: Implications for the Black-White Mortality Crossover
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsDupre, Matthew E., Alexis T. Franzese, and Emilio A. Parrado
JournalDemography
Volume43
Pagination141-164
ISBN Number0070-3370
Accession NumberPMID: 16579212
AbstractThis study investigates the relationships among religious attendance, mortality, & the black-white mortality crossover. We build on prior research by examining the link between attendance & mortality while testing whether religious involvement captures an important source of population heterogeneity that contributes to a crossover. Using data from the Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly, we find a strong negative association between attendance & mortality. Our results also show evidence of a racial crossover in mortality rates for both men & women. When religious attendance is modeled in terms of differential frailty, clear gender differences emerge. For women, the effect of attendance is race- & age-dependent, modifying the age at crossover by 10 years. For men, however, the effect of attendance is not related to race & does not alter the crossover pattern. When other health risks are modeled in terms of differential frailty, we find neither race nor age-related effects. Overall, the results highlight the importance of considering religious attendance when examining racial & gender differences in age-specific mortality rates. Tables, Figures, References. Adapted from the source document.
URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1353/dem.2006.0004