The Departed: The Economic Recession, Deportations, and Out-Migration among Latino Immigrants

TitleThe Departed: The Economic Recession, Deportations, and Out-Migration among Latino Immigrants
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsParrado, Emilio A., and Chenoa A. Flippen
JournalAnnals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Volume666
Pagination131-147
AbstractThis article explores the impact of the 2007 recession and immigration enforcement policies on Latin American immigrants' out-migration from the Durham, North Carolina, areaa new immigrant destination. Drawing on an original ethnosurvey collected in 2011, the analysis assesses the extent of out-migration over time, what precipitated the move, and whether individuals returned to their country of origin or migrated within the United States. We find that out-migration more than doubled after the 2007 recession and that migrants overwhelmingly returned to their home countries. While family considerations and accidents accounted for most of the departures before the recession, economic considerations became the dominant drivers of out-migration after 2007. Deportations also grew in number but accounted for a negligible share of all out-migration. Departures were more prevalent among immigrants from Mexico and those with lower educational attainment. Latin American migration, especially from Mexico, continues to be circular, and deportation is a relatively ineffective strategy for immigrant population control when compared to voluntary returns.
URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0002716216646563